Cambodian Khmer Sub-Consonants: Learn To Draw Write Khmer Characters Speaking Khmer is not spil hard spil it looks, but I have to admit that, reading and writing it is not spil effortless.

Cambodian Khmer People

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Origins and History of the Khmer Language

The Cambodian language, officially called the language of Khmer (pronounced spil one word like “Come Here”, without the H, “ComeEar”, or “ComeEye” , depending on region), is a very old language.

It has it’s roots from the Brahman or Brahmi system of writing, a character-based language dating back to India te Ancient Times. Proof of this is ter the writings within the ancient temples of Angkor Watten.

This article is designed spil an introductory implement ter understanding the Khmer Alphabet and Sentence Structure while writing and practising the language. Emphasis will also be placed on Pronunciation, which is very difficult, spil many of the Khmer sounds are not native to Latin-Language speaking people (French, English, Spanish, etc.).

Cambodian Khmer Sub-Consonants: Learn To Draw Write Khmer Characters

Speaking Khmer is not spil hard spil it looks, but I have to admit that, reading and writing it is not spil effortless. One of the major confusing elements of looking at Cambodian characters is that there are no spaces inbetween the words. Albeit this shows up to be tremendous, it’s not spil bad spil you think. See, when you’re able to decipher the sounds for each Khmer letterteken then you will naturally recognize where sentences start and end.

One significant thing to point out is that the Khmer alphabet does not translate the same spil Latin languages do to each other, there is no omschrijving for each letterteken ter Khmer to the English alphabet. Instead, the Khmer alphabet is a phonetic alphabet, that is, a group of sounds that have meaning and switch depending on implied accents and word structure. Spil is the case ter learning any fresh language, immersion and practice with native speakers is most likely the best way to become competent te speaking, writing, and reading Khmer.

Before wij dive into the alphabet, I’d like to mention a few interesting facts and trascendental points of rente about the Cambodian/Khmer alphabet and language. The very first point that I would like to make is that the written language is almost entirely phonetic. That’s good for us who are attempting to learn it because that means that there’s little switch ter the sounds merienda wij learn the basic alphabet. That concept offers a level of consistency.

There are some major differences inbetween Khmer and English. Te Khmer adjectives go after the noun. Ter English wij would say “pretty damsel”. Ter Cambodian it is just the opposite: “woman pretty”. Another big distinction which makes Cambodian lighter to read, write, and speak, is the fact that there are no verb conjugations. Merienda you become advanced you’ll realize that there ways to classify tenses but to be fair, it is only used when writing formally and infrequently used when spoken colloquially.

Here’s another rule that will help you ter simplifying how to learn to speak, read and write Cambodian: there are no articles such spil “a”, “and”, and “the”, etc. Another interesting factor within the Cambodian language is that there is no specific verb “to be” spil there is te most of the Latin languages. Cambodians simply say, “She Pretty” instead of “She Is Pretty”. Hopefully knowing some of thesis facts about the Cambodian language will make you more impatient to learn it and make it lighter during the process.

Google Maps: Cambodia

Cambodia, South East Asia

Cambodian Khmer Vowels

Learn About A Traditional Khmer Wedding with Photos!

This is the story of my traditional Khmer (Cambodian) wedding that took place te the spring of 2008. Wij combined Khmer traditions with American traditions (and even some Korean ones) and had a wonderful wedding!

Types of Vowels

Perhaps the hardest part about learning how to speak Cambodian is pronunciation. There are many sounds that wij Westerners have never bot exposed to both ter listening spil well spil speaking. It will take practice and most likely you will always have a slight accent compared to a native speaker. When you can speak Cambodian fluently, however, you’ll notice that native speakers will appreciate you attempting and will overlook your accent. Many will attempt to help you improve on your pronunciation. You will feel very proud knowing that you are appreciated by people who speak a language from the other side of the world!

The vowels within the Cambodian alphabet can be brief or long and have more than one sound depending on how it is used. The long vowels tend to be dragged out while brief vowels are quickly cut off spil they are spoken. Unluckily for us, many of thesis sounds are not represented te any of the sounds of the English language. There are ordinary vowels and ingewikkeld vowels, spil well spil consonant combination vowels. If you check the chart below you will see elementary vowels (a single character) and ingewikkeld vowels (combination of Two or more characters). Consonant Combination Vowels are just that, a combination of a consonant and vowel.

I spent a little bit of money on Amazon looking for the best book related to this topic. I have to tell you that there are few books out there, and even fewer that are useful resources on learning how to speak Khmer. What I can say, is after reviewing many books and workbooks, the best I have found so far is actually written by a Non-Cambodian American, Richard K. Gilbert. His book, Cambodian For Beginners is relatively effortless to use if you waterput the time and effort into learning the language. You should undoubtedly get the companion CD’s so that you can hear a native speaker pronounce the sounds of the language. His suggestions through transliteration of Khmer pronunciations is untouchable! I very suggest that you purchase this book if you are serious about learning Khmer, step by step te an organized style.

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